Malaga cruise

The Picasso Museum 
The formidable citadel of Gibralfaro
A Gourmet Destination

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Malaga

Tapas for all tastes

The elegant central zone of Málaga – a stop-off on your MSC cruise of the Mediterranean – is largely pedestrianized with the focal point, marble-paved Calle Marqués de Larios, lined with fashionable stores, its most elegant thoroughfare.
Plaza de la Constitución, Málaga’s main square, hosts a monumental fountain flanked by slender palms and the terraces of numerous cafés and restaurants. Málaga centre has a number of interesting churches and museums, not to mention the birthplace of Picasso and the Museo Picasso Málaga, housing an important collection of works by Málaga’s most famous son.

Perched on the hill above the town are the formidable citadels of the Alcazaba and Gibralfaro, magnificent vestiges of the seven centuries that the Moors held sway here.

Málaga is also renowned for its fish and seafood, which can be sampled at tapas bars and restaurants throughout the city, as well as at the old fishing villages of El Palo and Pedregalejo, now absorbed into the suburbs, where there’s a seafront paseo lined with some of the best marisquerías and chiringuitos (beachside fish restaurants) in the province.

The impressive Alcazaba is the place to make for if you’re joining a shore excursion. Clearly visible from your cruise ship, to the left of its entrance on c/Acazabilla stands the Roman Theatre accidentally discovered in 1951, and – following excavation and restoration – now a venue for various outdoor entertainments.

The citadel, too, is Roman in origin, with blocks and columns of marble interspersed among the Moorish brick of the double- and triple-arched gateways. Above the Alcazaba, and connected to it by a long double wall (the coracha), is the Gibralfaro castle. Like the Alcazaba, it has been wonderfully restored and now houses an interesting museum devoted to its history.

Must see place in Malaga

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    Reach the port

    Port of Malaga

    This section contains information on how to reach the port.

    Cruise Terminal:

    Dique de Levante

    Reach the port by

    • Car

      If you are hiring a car at the airport, take the following route to the port. Leave the airport on the MA21 and then continue along Av. Velazquez to the city centre or, alternatively, leave the airport on the MA21 and after 6 km (4 miles) take the exit for the MA22, signposted Malaga City Centre and Port.

      If you are hiring a car at the Maria Zambrano Railway Station, take the following route to the port: Join the Avenida Ingeniero Jose Maria Garnica and continue to the first roundabout, taking the third exit as if you were turning left, then continue along this road for 4 km (2½ miles) until you reach the port.
      Car
    • Train

      The Maria Zambrano Railway Station is only 4 km (2½ miles) from Málaga port. There is a taxi rank just outside the station.
      Train
    • Plane

      Malaga Airport is just 15 km (9 miles) from the city’s port. There is a taxi  rank outside the airport building.
      Travel time: about 18 minutes, depending on traffic.
      Plane

    Spain

    Love at first sight
    Love at first sight

    If you’re visiting Spain for the first time, be warned: this is a country that fast becomes an addiction. You might intend to come just for a cruise holiday, a walking tour or a city break, but before you know it you’ll find yourself hooked by something quite different – the celebration of some local fiesta, perhaps, or the otherworldly architecture of Barcelona.

    Even in the most over-touristic Mediterranean resorts of the Costa del Sol, you’ll be able to find an authentic bar or restaurant where the locals eat, and a village not far away where an age-old bullfighting tradition owes nothing to tourism. 


    A holiday to Spain can also show you the large cities of the north like Barcelona, which have reinvented themselves as essential cultural destinations (and don’t all close down for hours for a kip every afternoon). 


    And when the world now looks to Spain for culinary inspiration – the country has some of the most acclaimed chefs and innovative restaurants in the world – it’s clear that things have changed. Spain, despite the current economic uncertainty, sees itself very differently from a generation ago. 

    So should you – prepare to be surprised.